Police Forced to Mediate Tenant Dispute Over TV Show

by Chris on May 6, 2013

Police in Gloucester, Massachusetts were called in to settle a dispute between tenants which apparently centered around a Boston Red Sox game.

news report says the conflict started when one tenant removed and hid the cable box for the common area TV because she didn’t want another tenant to watch the game.

The apartment manager told police the two tenants have a contentious relationship.

Territorial disputes between tenants is not uncommon; however, it’s never desirable for tenants to resort to calling the police to resolve their squabbles.

Proactive property management may diffuse similar situations — and prevent a visit by local law enforcement:

Anticipate conflicts in common use areas like laundry, fitness rooms or entertainment areas. Develop house rules that are fair to every tenant. These may include time limits or having to reserve the space in advance.

Go over house rules with each tenant at orientation.

When a dispute arises, step in and mediate the problem.

Offer a stern warning to any chronic problem tenants.

Remind tenants the property is being managed even when the landlord is not on-site. For instance, post house rules in conspicuous places, and be easy to reach by phone. Develop a reputation for being responsible and responsive to tenant complaints.

When problems come up, tenants should feel compelled to call the landlord, and leave the police to handle emergencies.

The officer responding was able to convince the tenant to give back the cable box.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: