3 Ways to Avoid Move-Out Stresses for Landlord and Tenant

by Chris on October 10, 2011

Having a tenant move out at the end of a lease shouldn’t cost a landlord their profits–but sometimes it does.

At this crucial time, the landlord may have made promises to a new tenant to turn over a clean unit. Everything relies on the existing tenant getting the job done right, and on time.

You can shore up your chances of a cost-free move out by following these easy steps:

Spell It Out
Several weeks before the move-out date, provide the tenant with a checklist of items that must be completed by the end of the move. You can use the move-in inspection form, see this basic cleaning checklist, or follow this link for move out planning tips to share with the tenant.

Drop Names
Consider recommending vendors–carpet cleaners, maids, who you have a good relationship with. That way, the tenant doesn’t waste precious time searching or hire someone who is incompetent. Vendors who know you and your property are more likely to show up on schedule, and if something needs touched up later, you can call the same vendor back in to fix it–the work may be under warranty.

Dress Rehearsal
Offer to do a walk-through of the property while there is still time to fix items that you’ll otherwise have to finish–and that the tenant will be charged for.  Be very specific, and if necessary, explain how to perform the job. Conduct a formal move-out inspection after everything is out of the property and the tenant has turned over the keys. Have them sign the inspection report.

Take a proactive approach to move-outs — after all, it’s your profits that are at stake.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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