Cleaning Checklist Minimizes Problems When Tenants Move Out

by Chris on November 22, 2010

Move-out inspections go much better if both the tenant and the landlord have the same expectations.

This way, a tenant completes the necessary maintenance and cleaning, and returns the rental property in top shape.

The landlord avoids having to scramble to do the work before the next tenant moves in, and doesn’t have to fight with the tenant over who should pay.

Landlords can provide the tenant with a checklist of items that must be cleaned for a successful move out. Here’s a sample checklist for your tenants, courtesy of Service Alberta:

Clean in, out, behind and under the fridge and defrost and clean the freezer.

Leave the fridge door open if the power has been turned off.

Clean in, out, behind and under the stove and clean the oven and burners on the stove.

Wash the cupboards inside and outside.

Clean inside and outside (except multi-level buildings) of all windows/tracks, closet doors/tracks and patio doors/tracks.

Wash walls and floors.

Dust curtain rods and window coverings or replace yours with the landlords.

Dust or wash fans and vents, light fixtures, replace burnt out light bulbs.

Check the smoke detector, replace batteries as needed.

Clean bathroom thoroughly including the tub, tile, sink, vanity, mirror, medicine cabinet, cupboards and toilet.

Vacuum and clean the carpets.

Of course, there may be items that you need to add for your particular property, but this gives you a starting point. It is most helpful if you format this document as a checklist. Be sure to give this list to your tenants when they move in, and avoid misunderstandings down the road.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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