Landlord Tips for Property Showings

by Chris on April 22, 2019

Showing a rental property can be a time-consuming exercise, one that a landlord does not want to have to repeat several times before securing a new tenant.

Here are some tips that can maximize effectiveness and efficiency when it comes to property tours:

Prequalify applicants before showing the property. While an open house is appealing from a time-savings perspective, that generally attracts unqualified applicants. A more targeted approach is to speak with a prospect first and confirm qualifications and availability before wasting time showing the property to someone who’s not a good fit.

With apartment rentals, begin with the individual unit. Touring the common areas may be a waste of time if the prospect has no interest in the specific unit that’s available.

Point out the safety features of the property. Safety is tenants’ number one concern, and a landlord’s best selling point.

Be prepared to provide the prospect with the square footage and the cost of utilities — the two most common questions renters ask.

Arrive before the prospect and bring along a few helpful tools for quick fixes so the property shows well:

A small trash bag;
A handheld vacuum;
A microfiber cloth;
Smoke alarm batteries to eliminate annoying chirping;
A replacement light bulb — just in case; and,
Include a measuring tape for the tenant to evaluate space for furniture.

Do not bring along a tenancy agreement. The prospect must first complete a rental application and pass a tenant background check before moving to the leasing stage.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post is not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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