Saskatchewan Amends Residential Tenancies Act

by Chris on April 22, 2013

The Government of Saskatchewan has introduced a change that will increase the rental rights of seniors in the province.

Effective April 1, residents living in retirement homes, seniors’ retirement communities and independent living facilities that provide meals to residents over the age of 55 will be able to access the Office of Residential Tenancies to resolve disputes.

“Our government is pleased to provide residents living in these facilities with the same rights as other Saskatchewan tenants,” Justice Minister and Attorney General Gordon Wyant said. “This change will bring Saskatchewan in line with the rest of the country on this issue, and offer protection and security to our province’s seniors.”

“This change provides important protection for seniors,” Social Services Minister June Draude said. “Prior to this, seniors had no choice but to sign a rental contract drawn up by the landlord. This levels the playing field, by clearly outlining the legal rights and obligations of both landlords and tenants.”

In the past, residents living in these facilities were not covered under The Residential Tenancies Act, 2006, and did not have access to the Office of Residential Tenancies. Residents will now have access to that office, which offers a range of mediation and dispute resolution services for landlords and tenants.

Special care homes and personal care homes are still exempt, as they are licensed and regulated by the Ministry of Health under The Regional Health Services Act and The Personal Care Homes Act.

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Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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