Rule Changes Expected for Ontario Landlords

by Chris on October 8, 2012

The Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board announced that some rule changes are expected for 2013.

The LTB referred to pending legislation, Bill 140, which amends the Residential Tenancies Act.

The bill, when finalized, is likely to result in these changes:

The LTB will serve the Notice of Hearing (NOH) package on the parties, except in limited circumstances, when LTB Rules will delegate that responsibility to parties.
 
L1/L9 Hearing Day improvements. Last fall, the Board introduced the L1/L9 Hearing Day. The Board is working on some additional improvements that will lead to a more efficient hearing day process. The Board is simplifying the L1/L9 status update form that landlords must complete and submit on the hearing day. The revised version will eliminate some of the repetitive information in the current form.

A new form for consent orders in conjunction with the L1 or L9 application. The parties will spell out the terms agreed to in writing.

E-Filing. Improvements promise to ensure more accurate filings through better guidance, like noting missed information.

Above Guideline Increase (AGI)/A4 Process changes. The Board is also working on improving the AGI and A4 application process and is considering having a hearing officer resolve the applications that are proceeding by written hearing.

For AGIs with capital expenditures, pre-hearing conferences may be available to give the parties an opportunity to settle the application early, which may prove to be a more efficient way to handle these applications.

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Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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