Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board Announces Rule Change

by Chris on September 23, 2013

Beginning October 1, 2013, Social Justice Tribunals Ontario is introducing new Common Rules of Procedure that will apply to all tribunals, including the Landlord and Tenant Board.

tenant screeningLandlord tenant disputes also will be subject to the Landlord and Tenant Board Specific Rules which apply only within the Landlord and Tenant Board. Landlords will be governed by both sets of rules.

The goal of the Common Rules is to provide a consistent overarching framework of common procedures. For instance, these rules set forth who can represent a party in tribunal proceedings, and allow for both licensed and unlicensed representatives.

According to information provided by the Landlord and Tenant Board, the current exemptions permit the following unlicensed persons, among others, to act as a representative:

An unpaid friend or neighbour who is not in the business of providing
legal services, who does not receive compensation, and who provides
legal services in no more than 3 matters in a year;

An unpaid family member who is not in the business of providing legal
services and who does not receive compensation;

A member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) or the Constituency
assistant working in the MPP’s office;

An employee or volunteer from a trade union or appropriate
organization;

Students, volunteers and employees of legal clinics funded through
Legal Aid Ontario; and,

Individuals employed by a single employer, for example, a municipal
prosecutor or employee of a corporation appearing on behalf of the
corporation.

For more information, visit the Landlord and Tenant Board at www.ltb.gov.on.ca.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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