Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board Amends Rules and Guidelines

by Chris on January 16, 2012

Ontario’s Landlord and Tenant Board announced that it amended a number of its Rules of Practice and Interpretation Guidelines on January 6, 2012.

The Board also added one new Rule of Practice: Rule 32 – Legal Representatives Acting as Advocates and Witnesses in the Same Proceeding, and added two new Interpretation Guidelines: Interpretation Guideline 20 – Parties, Agents and Representatives, and Interpretation Guideline 21 – Landlords, Tenants, Occupants and Residential Tenancies.

The January 6 changes relate to the following rules:

Rule 15: Extending and Shortening Time
Rule 27: Ordering Costs to a Party or Board Costs
Rule 29: Review of Orders
Rule 32: Legal Representatives Acting as Advocates and Witnesses in the Same Proceedings (new)

and the following Interpretation Guidelines:

Guideline 1: Adjournments and Rescheduling Hearings
Guideline 14: Application for Rent Increases Above the Guideline
Guideline 20: Parties, Agents and Representatives (new)
Guideline 21: Landlords, Tenants, Occupants and Residential Tenancies (new)

To view the specific updates, please visit the LTB.

As a reminder, due to an earlier rule change,  landlords now need to complete the The L1/L9 – Information Update as of Hearing Date prior to attending a hearing scheduled for Applications to Evict for Non-Payment of Rent, and To Collect Unpaid Rent.  The LTB warns that failure to complete the form prior to the hearing may result in scheduling delays.

 

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

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Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Sara Gardner January 17, 2012 at 7:15 am

I don’t understand what a “suite meter” is. I have apartment buildings where each apartment has it’s own electricity meter (not in the apartment itself but outside or in a separate space) and before moving in, they need to call the hydro provider to put the hydro account in their name. Does this constitute a “suite meter” or not? Thank you!

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