Landlords Beware: Tenants Tracking Bedbugs

by Chris on May 26, 2014

The only thing that can compare with the frustration of finding bedbugs in your apartment complex is discovering a permanent report of the incident on the Internet.

Once bedbugs wiggle their way into your rentals, it can take months to get rid of them. Working closely with a pest control expert, you can eventually succeed. But once that’s accomplished, the saga isn’t over.

tenant screeningYou need to research whether one of your tenants reported the incident online. You don’t want a bad online review to scare away future tenants.┬áThe final step in the eradication process is to restore your online reputation.

You can accomplish this by taking a few minutes to search the bedbug registry websites. You’ll find these under Bedbug Reports or Bedbug Registry. There are a handful of these sites currently operating, and together they record thousands of tenant reports on hotels and apartments throughout Canada.

These websites have well-honed search tools, so you’ll probably be able to check for your property by address. The websites also allow landlords to weigh in, rectifying a false report, or adding a follow-up to a tenant’s complaint showing the “all clear” on bedbugs.

Rather than ignoring these online complaints, it’s better to face them head on, because you are never going to know how many prospective tenants you’ll lose as a result.

As more and more apartment seekers use the Internet to find their next rental home, you will need to get in the habit of checking what is being said about the rental online. You need to see the property through a prospective tenant’s eyes in order to minimize income loss.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Service, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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