How to Make the Most of Your Online Rental Ad

by Chris on August 2, 2010

An effective Internet rental ad attracts the right tenants, and that is the first step to effective tenant screening.

Here are three ways to make the most of your online rental ad:

Spell it Out

Unlike newspaper classifieds that charge by the letter or line, with most online ads, you don’t have to count every letter or abbreviate words to get your message across. Feel free to be descriptive, but avoid flowery terms which lack substance. “Lovely apartment” leaves the reader unsatisfied. Lovely what? Lovely view, lovely evening sunsets on the balcony, lovely kitchen appliances. Don’t stop at “Great Location.”  Try “Great location next to … waterfront, schools, shops.”

Pictures Seal the Deal

We know pictures paint a thousand words, but what are your pictures saying to applicants? Empty rooms, dirty windows, closed blinds – each tells a different story than the one you want to convey. Sure, your pictures must be honest, but that doesn’t mean they have to be uninspired. Take a cue from home stagers, and evoke the senses. Try a shot of the kitchen counter with a bottle of wine and a plate of cheese and fruit, or a basket of sweet pastries and coffee. Umm, pastries and coffee – I can’t wait to move in!

Discourage Scammers

Lay down the law early. Letting applicants know you require a personal meeting, photo ID, and a tenant credit check discourages professional tenants and scammers who are looking for an easy score.

This post is provided by Tenant Verification Services, Inc., helping landlords reduce the risks of renting with fraud prevention tools that include Tenant Screening, Tenant Background Checks, (U.S. and Canada), as well as Criminal Background Checks, and Eviction Reports (U.S. only).

Click Here to Receive Landlord Credit Reports

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel or consulting your local, state, federal or provincial tenancy laws.

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